SIGNS OF A NIGHTTIME BREATHING PROBLEM

IS YOUR CHILD SHOWING THE SIGNS OF A NIGHTTIME BREATHING PROBLEM?

If your child is struggling to breathe at night, he would tell you, right? Yes–if he could.

But he can’t tell you if he doesn’t know. And if he is part of the 11% of kids who is struggling with a nighttime breathing problem, he simply doesn’t know.

But he is showing signs.

So why are these 11% of kids not getting the help they need?  Because many parents simply don’t know the signs. And the unfortunate fact is that many pediatricians don’t know the signs, either.

This is a grave problem because these kids never get the help they need. And they desperately need help to avoid the devastation of a nighttime breathing problem. It is a serious problem that affects a child in every way:

  • physical health,
  • emotional well being,
  • academic performance, and
  • facial development.

YOUR CHILD WILL NOT HAVE THE LIFE HE SHOULD IF BREATHING DURING SLEEP IS A PROBLEM.

The good news is that children with sleep-related breathing problems are showing us signs…all day and all night. And if we can SPOT it, we can STOP it!

CHECK FOR THE NUMBER ONE SIGN

What is the number one sign of a sleep-related breathing problem? It’s simple: an OPEN MOUTH.

If your child keeps his mouth open–even if the lips are just slightly parted–it affects a child in every way.  The most obvious change is that the face grows longer. The bottom third of the face “elongates.” You can see this elongation in this  animation:

HOW TO SPOT IT:

FIRST…Check your child for the signs when he is AWAKE:

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Take the quiz!

SECOND…Check your child for the signs he is ASLEEP.

These signs:

  • are non-medical,
  • are easy-to-spot, and
  • can help you  change your child’s life.

If you see any of these signs when your child is AWAKE, check for other signs when your child is ASLEEP.

Is your child one of the 11% of all children in the industrialized world who are affected by sleep-related breathing problems (called “Pediatric Sleep-disordered Breathing (PSDB)” in the professional literature)? Find out now. Get the checklist here.

Disclaimer: This information is not offered as medical advice and should not be construed as such. Consult a qualified sleep professional for information on diagnosing and treating sleep-related breathing problems in children.

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